Eothen

Alexander William Kinglake

Eothen (“From the East”) recaptures a bold young Englishman’s exploits in the Middle East during the 1830s. Alexander William Kinglake recounts his rambles through the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt in a style radically different from other travel books of his era. Rather than dwelling on art or monuments, Kinglake’s captivating narrative focuses on the natives and their cities. His adventures ― populated by Bedouins, pashas, slave-traders, monks, pilgrims, and other colorfully drawn personalities ― include crossing the desolate Sinai with a four-camel caravan and a sojourn in plague-ridden Cairo.

Victorian readers were captivated by Kinglake’s chatty tone and his uncompromising honesty, and two centuries later this remarkable travelogue remains funny, fresh, and original. Presented here in a modern, up-to-date font, with an informative introduction by Simon C Drew.

“My favorite travel book. Sparkling, ironic, and terrific fun.” — Jan Morris

Wrap Up

Eothen

Pros

Cons

No Comments

Comments are closed.